Was McCrory's Tree.com compensation (much) larger than we thought?

It's possible there was more fruit on the Tree than we were led to believe:

Insider/Relation/Last Date/Transaction Type/OwnerType/Shares Traded/Last Price/Shares Held

MCCRORY PATRICK LLOYD Director 01/30/2013 Option Execute direct 10,063 0.0000 31,672

I don't know what it was worth then, but the stock is trading for just over $43 now, making that January 2013 option worth some $432, 709. And if that last (Shares Held) means what I think it does, that comes to $1.3 million and some change that McCrory is still(?) holding. I will freely admit, Fridays are bad days for me and my math, so please check behind me.

Daily dose: Pat McCrory's terrible, horrible, no-good very bad year

It's hard to imagine a more fitting end to the year we've suffered under Guvnor McCrory.

How the governor burned himself (Charlotte Observer) -- Not so long ago, as he launched his second campaign for the governor’s mansion, Pat McCrory vowed more than once that he would “clean up Raleigh.” It’s the kind of thing non-incumbents like to say, and it certainly wasn’t what gave McCrory his 2012 victory. But it didn’t hurt. … There were few, if any, murmurs about his integrity, even after seven terms as mayor of the state’s largest city. … It’s a simple rule, whether the questions are on an ethics form or from a nosy reporter. Don’t run from the money you say you earned. Own it. Because here’s what happens when you don’t: Your evasiveness gets on the front page of newspapers across your state. The New York Times writes about you. And people start to whisper. Now, there’s murmuring.
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/12/18/5393607/how-the-governor-burned-himself.html

The definition of insanity

Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result:

N.C. House members expect to vote Friday on whether to recommend easing requirements for mortgage lenders – a move that proponents say would cut costs for the industry but critics say would dilute protections for borrowers. Rep. John Bell, co-chair of a study committee examining the proposed changes, told the Observer on Thursday that he and other lawmakers plan to file legislation to be taken up when the General Assembly convenes in January.

“I personally believe that these were reasonable and well-vetted (changes) and these recommendations will continue to be vetted through the committee process in the General Assembly before becoming law – if they become law.”

The Attorney General's office is still conducting investigations of mortgage lender wrongdoing that took place six years ago, and you want to roll back consumer protections that are woefully inadequate already? Here's a little piece of advice, John: Just because lobbyists for a particular industry say they want something, it doesn't mean granting them their wish will improve the economy. For this industry, just the opposite is often the case, and you would know that if you had been paying attention for the last eight years.

Taxpayer-funded mediocrity: Virtual charters get thumbs-up

Despite their questionable performance in other states:

Both schools received unanimous endorsements from an interviewing committee that included representatives from the State Board of Education, its charter school advisory board, state education staff, and an outside evaluator. Some on the panel had to think hard about approving K12, and the company was asked to respond to questions about its performance in other states.

Tennessee’s education commissioner last year threatened to close Tennessee Virtual Academy, managed by K12, unless student performance showed significant improvement. Students in the Tennessee online charter had minimal learning growth. The board of trustees for the K12 school in Pennsylvania decided not to renew its management contract with the company, though it will continue to use its curriculum.

Where are the all-of-a-sudden-interested-in-education legislators who vehemently attacked the Common Core? Where's Lieutenant Dan? Taxpayer dollars going to fund an out-of-state education program, and a poor-performing one at that? Crickets. Proving it's not about the outcomes, it's about the method of delivery. And when that method generates private-sector profits for somebody, all other sins are forgiven

McCrory's meltdown

Pat McCrory really doesn't like anyone shattering his delusions. Where Pat lives, in Alternate Realityville, he is always right, he has high ethical standards and everyone loves him.

When the Associated Press pointed out that Pat got a nice payoff from the Lending Tree folks, and that he hadn't actually earned that payoff according to the standard rules, and that the didn't fully report the payoff on his ethics forms, and that he didn't actually resign fro the Lending Tree board until after he became governor, and that there were several irregularities associated with this transaction; and then reminded readers that all this was reminiscent of Pat's previous highly questionable behavior surrounding his Duke Energy stock holdings, Pat melted down. [And not just because attempts to describe all of Pat's vagaries result in an extreme run-on sentence :-) ].

The day after a wire service reported that North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory received a six-figure stock payout from an online mortgage broker that is regulated by the state, the governor’s emphatic reaction to the story nearly eclipsed the news itself.

The fracking farce: rules approved

Not that it's a surprise to anyone, but the NC Mining & Energy Commission ignored the advice of legal counsel and rammed through a bad set of fracking rules to meet a stupid, arbitrary deadline.

North Carolina’s proposed fracking safety standards sailed through a rules review Wednesday despite a staff attorney’s warning that several rules failed to meet state standards and should be put out for public hearing.

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