Keep our kids first

Apparently North Carolina ranks 48th in the nation in per pupil spending? And our average for teacher pay ranks 46th? To say that is discouraging is an understatement.

According to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI),

This will be the fifth consecutive year public schools have endured significant funding reductions. Many local superintendents have shared that schools in their districts have already been "cut to the bone." For years, many schools in North Carolina have operated with fewer teachers and staff, limited resources such as textbooks and technology, less training for teachers, and with facilities in need of update and repair. One superintendent has described the situation as a rubber band that has been stretched to its breaking point.

Given the harsh spending cuts over the past few years, it seems strange that our lawmakers are focused on charter schools and other faddish privatization schemes. No matter what your opinion is on charter schools, they take money away from our traditional public schools. Since 2008, the number of charter schools has grown by almost 50 percent, while over that same period nearly 4,000 traditional public schools have closed.

If you had a apple for every North Carolina school closed you would have a solid ton of apples and enough to keep the doctor away for a decade. That's too many public schools to lose.

Fortunately, people are taking action to stop the backslide. One of the groups of people working on putting education first is Action NC - a group I'm proud to work with and be a member of.

In fact, Action NC is so concerned about the effects of splitting our education dollars that we have launched Keep Our Kids First education campaign. The campaign will improve public education in North Carolina by bringing the public together to demand kids be the highest priority of our state government.

Public funds must fund schools that serve all NC children, not a select few segregated by class and race. We need to be careful about the education choices ahead of us, North Carolina. We need to our public schools to lift us up; we can't allow the NCGA to let us down.

Comments

NC educators will be writing in the dirt with a stick, soon.

Since we are next to last in education, some feel that it would be a libertarian
milestone to reach last place in education, since we're almost there. Maybe teachers and students should write in the dirt with a stick.

Don't Worry, There's an Easy Fix

Just think of all the money we will save when Phil Berger gets rid of all those "highly paid" experienced teachers and the charter schools can hire unqualified criminal teachers (presumably they would work cheap).

The push to digital learning

coincides with Murdoch getting into the education business with his Wireless Generation. After what he has done with NewsCorp and what THAT audience "knows" we let him anywhere near our schools?

Thank you for bring attention to the state of

NC schools Jerimee. We have not seen a new textbook in over 5 years at my high school while we are throwing money at technology as if it's "the answer". Students are not issued textbooks; teachers are lucky to have a classroom set that get used in class but cannot be taken home.
48th and 46th .... our rankings are disgusting and a disgrace.

Those who can teach, do teach.
Those who cannot teach, pass laws about teaching.

A couple more tidbits about our schools

I just got a schoolwide email from a teacher asking for staples.
I got another email today saying that our school's air conditioning will not be available until it can be repaired. We are to open windows until further notice.

The biggest problem with education is all the morons who think they know what's best for students but really don't have a friggin' clue.

And have you heard of the reversion of funds that goes on every year?

We need to get after our legislators

These are exactly the types of things that we need to be thinking about! Clearly we need to get after our legislators - they need to hear what's really happening in the school systems and be forced to live up to their responsibilities.