Netroots heavyweight Americablog endorses Jim Neal

Joe Sudbay at the progressive political powerhouse Americablog has excellent political instincts. People laughed at him last year when he predicted Hillary Clinton would run into serious political trouble during the primaries - heck, I was one of them.

It's not easy to get an endorsement at this high-traffic blog; Joe and the crew over there carefully consider who they back in races, and are looking at the impact of swing states and the growth of progressive politics -- and they have endorsed Jim Neal for the U.S. Senate.

Topic of the week: Newspapers

Our friends in the newspaper industry are increasingly working through virtual channels. Along the way, many reporters find themselves over-extended, being asked by management to cover their beats and write their news stories, but also keep up blogs, respond to reader comments, and even deliver multi-media content. And it all comes at a time when the vanishing newspaper is the talk of the trade.

Guard, Soldier, or Iraqi: An examination into Patrick McHenry's "little messup"

It seems that Patrick McHenry has fired back at the now very famous (even now on MSNBC!) video of Patrick McHenry calling a soldier (or something to that regard) "two bit", after the soldier correctly denied him access to a gym. So, what's the deal? Does McH get off because he called a "foreign national" a "two bit" instead of an American soldier?

Answer: No, it's worse. Here's why.

First off, let me explain the situation. At a local Lincoln county dinner of some sort, Patrick McHenry told a story about him "bravely" missing a missile attack in a Baghdad green zone. Long story short, McH woke up in the morning to go to the gym, was denied access because he had no credentials, pitched a hissy fit for 30 minutes by some "two bit" guard who refused to let him in just because he was a Distinguished Visitor, and then marched back to take a shower- when the Green Zone was hit by missiles, promptly destroying the gym.

Saturday: Facing Racial and Ethnic Barriers panel at the 2008 Unity Conference

On Saturday I will moderate the panel "Still Crossing Those Bridges: Facing Racial and Ethnic Barriers" at the 2008 Unity Conference, held at UNC Chapel Hill (more info here). This panel was originally developed for the EqualityNC conference last year, and it was so popular that the organizers of tomorrow's event wanted us to expose it to a larger audience.

The topics are particularly relevant in new ways, in the wake of Barack Obama's speech on race:

* Coming out on in communities of color on NC/Southern Campuses-- identifying the challenges
* Effect of religious-based bigotry coming from the pulpit
* Finding LGBT cultural common ground between different communities of color (black, brown, white) on campuses -- what are those barriers?
* How do we create a safe space online and offline to discuss race relations?
* Are separate racial/ethnic social spaces essential for LGBT communities of culture on campuses and why?
* If so, how, as a movement, can these groups come together to on initiatives to move LGBT rights forward -- what tools and approaches work, what have been the frustrations?
* How do class and culture factor into the equation?

Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work

April 24 is designated as Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.

Designed to be more than a career day, the Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work® program goes beyond the average “shadow” an adult. Exposing girls and boys to what a parent or mentor in their lives do during the work day is important, but showing them the value of their education, helping them discover the power and possibilities associated with a balanced work and family life, providing them an opportunity to share how they envision the future and begin steps toward their end goals in a hands-on and interactive environment is key to their achieving success. Each year, development of new interactive activities and partnerships will assist us in taking girls and boys to the future they dream of.

If handled properly, this can be a rewarding experience for parents and children, and I highly encourage you to participate if you can.

But that's not really the point of this diary. What if you had to take your daughter and son to work, because your child care provider went on strike?

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