astroturf organizations

Emerald Isle conflict and the Public Trust Doctrine

One man's freedom is another man's loss of freedom:

State Superior Court denied the claim in 2014 and granted a summary judgment for Emerald Isle. The Nieses also lost their appeal in November 2015. The state Court of Appeals, in unanimously affirming the judgment of the lower court, delivered a robust defense of the public trust doctrine.

Faison's "clean energy" PAC supporting Richard Burr

I hate to say I told you so, but...

"Senator Burr is an important conservative voice in a politically- and energy-diverse state," ClearPath Action Fund Founder and CEO Jay Faison said. "He deserves another six years to continue an increasingly central role in helping shape the roadmap for clean energy in North Carolina and elsewhere."

ClearPath Action Fund will tout Burr as a conservative clean energy leader in a six-figure campaign, which will be run by Anthro and featured on many digital networks, including Facebook, Google, Twitter, SpotX and 4info. The innovative campaign, which will be given a budget of at least $400,000, will leverage a sophisticated microtargeting strategy to identify persuadable clean energy voters.

If you had any doubt about the true motives of this group, I sure hope this development settles those unanswered questions. Richard Burr is no friend to clean energy, or climate change protections, or anti-pollution efforts, or (fill in the blank):

In addition to pollution, Duke Energy now leaking propaganda

Disseminating Koch Brothers' subsidized misinformation:

Coal ash isn’t toxic, in fact it’s harmless, according a new report that Duke Energy has been disseminating this week. But a Carolina Public Press investigation has found serious doubts about the credibility of the report that relies heavily on the statements of one scientist who may have been misquoted or taken out of context.

Claiming that toxicity isn’t a valid a concern hasn’t been an angle the company pursued previously. Carolina Public Press contacted the scientist on whom the article relied for its claims. His response raised questions about the integrity of the reporting in the article from the organization and why Duke Energy would promote an article with such dubious claims.

Okay, so: "Toxicity" determinations are directly tied to how a chemical or element interacts with a biological organism. You can determine the radioactivity of an element in the absence of such, but toxicity can only be formally mapped by actual damage, a much more difficult process. And since many of these potential toxins do not bioaccumulate, and are eventually expelled from the human body before they can be detected, the "smoking gun" is no longer there to find. This is what (I believe) the researcher in question was trying to convey. But what's more alarming than Duke Energy citing a article in efforts to whitewash their dirty laundry, are the efforts by state government to bully media outlets into silencing the NRDC:

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