campaign finance irregularities

Foley resigns from State Board of Elections

Apparently he can take a hint:

Paul J. Foley resigned early Thursday, less than a week after the Associated Press reported that for more than a year he regularly pressed staff at the agency for updates and details about the probe targeting his firm's longtime client. He eventually recused himself, but only after elections staff learned of nearly $1.3 million in payments from Chase Burns to the law firm where Foley is a partner.

Not only was Foley caught with his meddling hand in the investigation cookie jar, he very well may be playing a role in the current lawsuit in Winston-Salem, due to his involvement in suppressing the college vote in Watauga County. All that being said, I can't help but have some suspicions over the timing of his fall from grace. We were kept in the dark about this investigation into Foley until less than a week ago, and a few days after that the BoE presents its findings that nobody did anything wrong in the whole Chase Burns fiasco. The term "convenient" comes to mind, with the word "distraction" closely following on its heels.

Tillis starts his own PAC, plays with model of lear jet

Okay, I made up the part about the toy jet, but the PAC thing is real:

In launching a political action committee to raise funds, Thom Tillis has made his first name an acronym: Together Holding Our Majority.

The Federal Elections Commission this week posted the filing that creates THOMPAC. The entity is a leadership PAC – the type formed by members of Congress – which raises money for the lawmaker’s non-campaign expenses and provides a vehicle to contribute to their colleagues’ campaigns.

I think it's blatantly obvious who Tillis' #1 constituent is. He should have named it "THAM" (Thom Holding Alla Money). Me? I'm just trying to hold my gorge down...

The Bergermeister's campaign money problem

It looks like pay-to-play politics is back in style, with a vengeance:

State Senate leader Phil Berger raised nearly $2 million through the third quarter of the year, according to his campaign finance report.

Below are the top individual and PAC donors with listed "election sum to date" contributions.There is a caveat. Every sum listed below exceeds the state's $5,000 contribution limit. There are a lot of them, 42 individual contributors alone.

Bless his heart, Doug doesn't believe Berger's campaign received all that money, that it was a calculation error. There's been some calculating, alright, but it's more along the lines of, "If we get caught, we'll just claim ignorance and 'give' the money back."

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