NC constitution

The threat gerrymandering poses to the NC Constitution

Cause & effect are too obvious to ignore:

Over in the Senate there’s a more devious and dangerous proposed amendment to the state constitution, with roots in the misleadingly-named “Taxpayer Bill of Rights” (that passed the Senate last year but didn’t get a vote in the House) to cap the state income tax rate at 5.5 percent. Article V of the state constitution currently sets a 10 percent ceiling.

Significantly, the four sponsors of this unnecessary plan, face no consequence or accountability. The lead sponsor, Sen. Robert Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, isn’t seeking re-election. The three other sponsors, Bill Rabon, R-Brunswick; Jerry Tillman, R-Randolph; and Louis Pate, R-Wayne, face no opposition in the fall campaign. They are utterly without accountability to a single voter in their districts – and the state – for their actions.

It's times like this that I look back on our efforts to encourage candidates to file with a feeling of abject failure. While the list exceeded our expectations, several critical (potential) races were left by the wayside. While I'm wallowing in self-pity, it's only fitting that I bring you the news (if you didn't already know) that Elon Law Professor Eric Fink failed to amass enough (qualified) signatures to challenge Phil Berger in November's General Election for the NC Senate. It was a damned fine effort, and I hope Eric takes another shot two years from now. But we really need to make sure the most powerful Republicans have opponents, regardless of the demographics. Or we risk allowing their hubris to destroy our state.

Constitutional deformation coming soon!

Senator Ralph Hise, ( District 47 -Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Yancey) has introduced Joint Resolution 507:

... under the authority of Article V of the Constitution of the United States,
the North Carolina General Assembly has applied to the United States Congress to call a
convention of the states to amend the United States Constitution and adopt a countermand
amendment to authorize the states, upon a vote of three-fifths of the state legislatures, to nullify
and repeal a federal statute, executive order, judicial decision, regulatory decision by a federal
government agency, or government mandate imposed on the states by law that adversely affects
the interests of the states, in order to properly exercise the states' constitutional authority to
check federal power, preserve state sovereignty, and protect the rights of the states and the

North Carolina's constitutional circus

After watching an unending string of their unconstitutional laws be obliterated by the courts, Tillisberger passed a law (itself unconstitutional) requiring lawsuits against their unconstitutional laws to be heard by a three-judge panel. They figured that this might, through some (ahem) "judicious" judge shopping, allow their unconstitutional laws to remain in force.

They never expected that Deputy Assistant Governor Pat McCrory would get off his leash just long enough to file suit against one of their unconstitutional laws, and they surely didn't expect he'd win.

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