NC GOP

GOP crams online charter schools down NC's throat

Mandating a failing system:

The state budget that Gov. Pat McCrory signed into law earlier this month includes a provision requiring the State Board of Education to authorize two online charter schools to serve K-12 students by next fall.

In drafting the budget provision for the virtual charter schools, lawmakers ignored many of the education board's recommendations. For example, lawmakers allowed the online schools to receive both state and local funding for students, while regular charter schools receive only state money. State law also lets the online schools enroll more students and have more students drop out than educators wanted.

Bolding mine. When your pet project (K12 Inc) has so many shortcomings and faults it can't meet even the minimum standards of being authorized, what do you do? You either lower the standards or you force the authorizing body to acquiesce via government fiat. Adding to the ever-growing list of behaviors exhibited by our General Assembly that closely resemble that of Third-World tyrants.

AP ignores McCrory's connection to convicted fraudster

Which is becoming a habit with mainstream media:

A top executive at a North Carolina paving company has pleaded guilty in federal court in what prosecutors say was an $87 million scheme involving government-funded road construction projects.

Carl Andrew Boggs III pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court to conspiracy to defraud the U.S. Department of Transportation and money laundering. The 50-year-old from Waxhaw is president and part owner of Boggs Paving, Inc. He now faces up to 25 years in prison and $500,000 in fines.

And not one word about Boggs hosting a campaign fundraiser for Gubernatorial candidate McCrory, during the time Boggs was ripping off the Federal government, no less. If this had been Bev Perdue or Mike Easley, the press would be all over this connection like flies on dog poop. Infuriating.

The NC GOP's extremist legislation leads to a litany of lawsuits

And it may be the people's only defense against an overreaching government:

Since Republicans took control of the General Assembly in 2011, the constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, redrawn legislative and congressional district voting maps, a law requiring voters to present photo identification at the polls, a law requiring a doctor to narrate an ultrasound before providing an abortion, a law creating a "Choose Life" license plate and a budget provision eliminating the tenure rights of veteran teachers all have led to lawsuits against the state.

Michael Gerhardt, Samuel Ashe Distinguished Professor in Constitutional Law and director of the Center for Law and Government at the University of North Carolina School of Law, said he doesn't find the raft of lawsuits unusual. "When you have a legislature that was fairly aggressive like this one was to try and change a lot of areas of life in North Carolina, then you can expect some push-back," Gerhardt said.

Republicans are outraged that the courts became involved in these issues, but they should have thought about that when they decided to attack certain groups of citizens. Prejudice and misogynistic leanings have no place in the halls of government, and the products of those twisted beliefs should be challenged.

Aldona's revolving door swings again

The grass isn't the only thing greener on the other side:

After helping to develop the governor's plan, which emphasizes the development of local doctor networks to care for Medicaid patients, Peal is going to work for a company whose lobbyists have worked on behalf of a competing measure put forward by state Senate leaders. That Senate plan would have relied more heavily on companies such as WellCare to manage the state's Medicaid population.

Mullins said the administration would continue to push for a Medicaid reform model that relies on local providers and emphasized Peal was part of a group that had developed the accountable care organization model put forward by McCrory. Mullins said Wednesday that Peal did not want to comment for this story.

I bet she didn't.

Coal Ash Wednesday: I'll see your fine and raise you a rate

Disciplinary action or election-year posturing?

The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources issued a notice of violation to Duke over the ongoing contamination at the L.V. Sutton Electric Plant in New Hanover County. The site includes a pair of unlined dumps estimated to hold 2.6 million tons of ash.

The state says monitoring wells near Duke's dumps at Sutton showed readings exceeding state groundwater standards for boron, thallium, selenium, iron, manganese and other chemicals. Thallium was used for decades as the active ingredient in rat poison until it was banned because it is so highly toxic.

Make no mistake, Duke Energy should be fined for allowing toxic chemicals to leak from their coal ash impoundments. But considering they will soon be pursuing (and likely be granted) rate increases from the NCUC, whatever fines they do pay for this will be easily recouped from the people. And efforts by DENR to conceal or edit test results calls the timing of this action into question:

Pope puppet appointed to NC Court of Appeals

The rumors of Art Pope's loss of influence over McCrory are wildly exaggerated:

In a press release on Monday afternoon, Governor Pat McCrory announced that he will appoint Winston-Salem lawyer Richard Dietz to the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Dietz will fill the seat of Judge Bob Hunter, Jr., whom McCrory appointed as a Justice on the North Carolina Supreme Court ahead of elections in November. Judge hunter will be sworn in on September 6th to be followed by Dietz.

“Richard Dietz has an esteemed legal record and an extensive background in appellate practice,” said Governor McCrory. “His experience, service on the North Carolina Courts Commission and involvement in his community will make him a valuable addition to the Court of Appeals.”

What you won't find in this article is his recent attachment to Civitas and the John Locke Foundation, including his indoctrination training in free-market principles:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The harsh reality of the GOP's failure to properly fund public education:

And no math formula can make it right:

Public forum on fracking in Rockingham County this evening

And the voices of dissent are growing:

The N.C. Mining and Energy Commission is seeking input from the public on proposed rules for oil and gas development. The meeting is scheduled for 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Aug. 25 at Rockingham County High School in Wentworth.

Also on Monday, opponents to fracking are organizing a Frack Free NC rally at 4:15 p.m. in front of Rockingham County High School.

So far, opponents have outnumbered pro-frackers by a sizeable margin, but that hasn't stopped media from giving them equal time. Which is exactly what FreedomWorks is counting on.

The GOP clown car pulls up in church parking lot

And the walls that separate church and state teetered precariously:

Two possible contenders for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination – Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee – are scheduled to be in Charlotte on Sept. 14 to headline “Star Spangled Sunday,” a live national webcast from First Baptist Church of Charlotte.

The Rev. Mark Harris, who pastors First Baptist, said the event celebrating the 200th anniversary of the national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” is also set to include some other speakers popular with conservative Christians. Namely Steve Green, president of Hobby Lobby, the national chain of craft stores, and the Benham brothers – David and Jason – of Concord.

Pretty sure Francis Scott Key didn't envision people celebrating prejudice in his name, or using a pulpit to politically motivate other people: "Either you think or else others have to think for you and take power from you pervert and discipline your natural tastes civilize and sterilize you." What he said.

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