NC GOP

Charlotte police declare open season on shooting suspects

When your lawyer and the DA are friends, it's all good:

Even though Charlotte-Mecklenburg police Officer Anthony Holzhauer was represented by the same law firm, Murray did not recuse himself. He ruled this month that Holzhauer was justified when he shot and killed 20-year-old Janisha Fonville in her north Charlotte apartment. The decision meant Holzhauer will not face criminal charges.

Legal scholars contacted by the Observer said Murray’s ties to his former firm pose the appearance of a conflict of interest and that Murray should have removed himself from the Fonville case.

Heck, at least in Ferguson there was a Grand Jury, even if it did work to convict the victim posthumously. In this situation, one man gets to decide not to prosecute a client of the firm that funded his election campaign. In the excerpt below, there are two gaping inconsistencies that reveal Murray's poor judgment. See if you can spot them, the answer will be in the comment section:

Religious discrimination bill stalls in NC House

Unfortunately, it's all about the Benjamins:

“For this session, the bill is not going to move,” Moore said during a hastily called news conference. “This bill in its current format, at the current time, is not the proper path to go.”

It came a day after the bill apparently divided House Republicans, who discussed it in a private caucus meeting. The measure had drawn opposition from businesses, including IBM and American Airlines. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory had also expressed reservations.

Don't get me wrong, I'm encouraged by the fact that powerful corporate entities opposed this measure. But what if they hadn't? When your elected officials gauge the propriety of a piece of legislation almost exclusively by whether or not it will hurt them come fundraising time, it simply proves their moral compass is spinning madly. That's no way to run a sausage factory.

GOP poverty solution: Cut programs, then tax charitable non-profits

The convoy of bad ideas keeps rolling down the road:

Senate Bill 700, which was recently introduced in the General Assembly, threatens nonprofit tax exemption in North Carolina. It would reduce the cap on sales tax refunds to $100,000 per year, down from the current $45 million. If passed, this law would create new taxes for hundreds of nonprofits. They would have to pay a tax on almost everything they buy to support their charitable missions, including food, supplies, construction materials, computers, and utilities. This proposal would create unintended harm for nonprofits in all 100 counties of North Carolina.

The next time one of your Republican friends throws out the tired old argument, "The government shouldn't be helping poor people, churches and other charitable organizations do a much better job at it," make sure and mention this. Their zest for improving the lives of the 1% eventually places them in conflict with most of their stated positions, and the sooner voters realize they have no solutions the better.

Progress NC petition to Governor McCrory on Vetoing new abortion bills

Via e-mail:

It was a simple question and a clear, one-word answer from Governor McCrory.

“If you are elected governor, what further restrictions on abortion would you agree to sign? None."

Unfortunately, less than a year later, Governor McCrory broke that promise and signed a bill that mandated new abortion regulations. Now there is another, even more radical, bill moving through the General Assembly and Governor McCrory again has a chance to keep his promise. HB 465 would triple the already unnecessary waiting period, and would prevent any employee of UNC or ECU medical schools from performing abortions in almost all circumstances. This would severely undermine the high-quality medical education that students and residents receive.

If you’re tired of the attacks on women and the University System, then stand with us.

Here's the link to the petition. Go ahead and sign it, and then you can explain to me and others how petitions don't accomplish anything, how the energy would be better spent getting out the vote or getting out of town, or whatever other plan you have. ;)

Coal Ash Wednesday: Don't drink the water

coalash.jpg

There goes the neighborhood:

Most of the private wells tested near Duke Energy’s North Carolina coal ash ponds show contaminants above state groundwater standards, state regulators said Tuesday.

Of 117 test results mailed to power plant neighbors in recent days, 87 exceeded groundwater standards, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources said.

And every one of those neighbors needs to be compensated and/or have potable water made available to them by Duke Energy, at no cost to the homeowners, the state, or other Duke Energy ratepayers. You break it, you buy it. But as long as DENR continues to run interference for Duke Energy, people are going to suffer:

NC lawmakers push nullification of Federal firearms laws and regulations

Talk about having a "chilling effect.":

§ 1‑641. Certain federal law regulating firearms invalid.
A federal law, including a statute, an executive, administrative, or court order, or a rule, that infringes on a law‑abiding citizen's right to keep and bear arms under the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution or Section 30 of Article I of the North Carolina Constitution, is invalid and not enforceable in this State. A federal law that infringes on a law‑abiding citizen's right to keep and bear arms includes a law that does any of the following:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The GOP's great tax shift continues:

This is what happens when you realize your previous "bad idea" won't go unnoticed, so you switch to another "really bad idea" and hope that one won't hurt you come election time.

Vacated.

The US Supreme Court rejected the NC Supreme Court's ruling upholding the NC General Assembly's racially-motivated redistricting scheme, and sent the case back to the lower Court for a second look. This doesn't mean the redistricting itself has been rejected, but it is a step in that direction. Film at eleven. Actually, they don't allow filming in the Supreme Court, which is why we see those all those fancy sketches. And I doubt if we'll know more by eleven...*sigh* You know what I'm talking about.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - NC GOP