NC GOP

The anti-abortion zealots are not done yet

As the upcoming session of the NCGA will soon demonstrate:

The rules also require written agreements with nearby hospitals for emergencies – or proof that the clinic tried to obtain those agreements. That’s important, because hospitals in other states could effectively shut down a clinic by declining such agreements.

A handful of speakers, however, were critical. That included North Carolina Values Coalition executive director Tami Fitzgerald, who said the rules don’t go far enough in protecting women. Specifically, Fitzgerald wants stiffer certification requirements and no exceptions for clinics that don’t obtain transfer agreements with hospitals.

Nothing gets under my skin worse than a double-talking hypocrite. Tami Fitzgerald doesn't give a damn about "protecting women," and every time lies like that slide out of her mouth, her "values" are exposed for what they are, nothing more than the ravings of a brainwashed cult member.

Pope's Puppets swing and miss in defending UNC BOG

When Libertarians try to rewrite history:

In the 2012-13 academic year, the center hosted members of the AFL-CIO to discuss “the legislature’s war on labor”; screened clips from a “Story of America: A Nation Divided,” about “the fundamental divisions and the political struggle throughout America”; screened “The American Winter,” which “highlights the human impact of budget cuts to social services, a shrinking middle class, and the fracturing of the American Dream”; discussed “Wage Theft in North Carolina”; and invited people to projects sponsored by the Durham People’s Alliance and the N.C. Justice Center.

Where were the success stories of combating poverty through limited government and economic freedom – the approach that has saved millions from poverty in countries such as Taiwan, Estonia and South Korea? They weren’t mentioned, as far as one can tell from the archives.

To their main underlying complaint, that Conservative and/or Free Market proponents are not "invited" to such seminars: When you refuse to acknowledge that poverty and wage inequality and workplace discrimination and a bunch of other problems even exist, much less need to be addressed, why should you be included in these discussions? And we wouldn't be having many of these discussions if your bent ideology hadn't permeated the Legislature already, encouraging massive cuts to the social safety net. So thanks, but no thanks. And as far as your "missing" examples of small government success stories, you've (as usual) overlooked the obvious:

The definition of insanity

Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result:

N.C. House members expect to vote Friday on whether to recommend easing requirements for mortgage lenders – a move that proponents say would cut costs for the industry but critics say would dilute protections for borrowers. Rep. John Bell, co-chair of a study committee examining the proposed changes, told the Observer on Thursday that he and other lawmakers plan to file legislation to be taken up when the General Assembly convenes in January.

“I personally believe that these were reasonable and well-vetted (changes) and these recommendations will continue to be vetted through the committee process in the General Assembly before becoming law – if they become law.”

The Attorney General's office is still conducting investigations of mortgage lender wrongdoing that took place six years ago, and you want to roll back consumer protections that are woefully inadequate already? Here's a little piece of advice, John: Just because lobbyists for a particular industry say they want something, it doesn't mean granting them their wish will improve the economy. For this industry, just the opposite is often the case, and you would know that if you had been paying attention for the last eight years.

Taxpayer-funded mediocrity: Virtual charters get thumbs-up

Despite their questionable performance in other states:

Both schools received unanimous endorsements from an interviewing committee that included representatives from the State Board of Education, its charter school advisory board, state education staff, and an outside evaluator. Some on the panel had to think hard about approving K12, and the company was asked to respond to questions about its performance in other states.

Tennessee’s education commissioner last year threatened to close Tennessee Virtual Academy, managed by K12, unless student performance showed significant improvement. Students in the Tennessee online charter had minimal learning growth. The board of trustees for the K12 school in Pennsylvania decided not to renew its management contract with the company, though it will continue to use its curriculum.

Where are the all-of-a-sudden-interested-in-education legislators who vehemently attacked the Common Core? Where's Lieutenant Dan? Taxpayer dollars going to fund an out-of-state education program, and a poor-performing one at that? Crickets. Proving it's not about the outcomes, it's about the method of delivery. And when that method generates private-sector profits for somebody, all other sins are forgiven

Coal Ash Wednesday: "It's out of our hands."

Duke energy will no longer be responsible for ash dumped in Lee and Chatham Counties:

In most cases, the landowner would be legally liable for such damages. But the owner of the abandoned brick mine is not Duke Energy; it's Green Meadow LLC, a new corporation led by the president of Charah Inc., a Kentucky ash disposal company contracting with Duke on the coal ash project.

Once Charah takes possession of the ash, Duke may not be responsible for the waste, legal experts say, a contingency that may be part of Duke's private contract with Charah. And if Green Meadow or Charah does not have the money to pay damages emanating from a lawsuit, then county governments and the state—not Duke Energy—may be ultimately forced to pay, legal experts say.

This won't be the first time Duke Energy has absolved itself of the responsibility for it's toxic coal ash, but it should be the last. Even the "business-friendly" GOP-led Legislature should recognize that dumping the cost onto taxpayers is wrong. Then again, they haven't shown much compassion for the 99% since they've been at the wheel, so I don't hold out much hope they'll take steps to stop this shifting of responsibility.

For McCrory, money does grow on a Tree

Ethical questions just keep piling up:

In the months after receiving his $171,071 payout of stock from Tree.com, McCrory appointed the state's banking director and a majority of the banking commissioners who regulate mortgage brokers. Some of Tree.com's payments to McCrory and Sanford weren't publicly disclosed until May 2014, when the company filed its 2013 year-end proxy statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

McCrory declined requests for an interview. In a written statement, McCrory spokesman Josh Ellis said the governor fully complied with state law and "continues to uphold high ethical standards."

From taking money from out-of-state gambling concerns to insider stock trading, McCrory's ethical lapses have become so numerous they can no longer be attributed to ignorance or incompetence. It's time for a special prosecutor to open an investigation, just like George Holding did when Mike Easley was called to the carpet.

Just how crazy has the NC GOP become?

Thoroughly bat-shit insane, that's how crazy the NC GOP has become. The latest evidence that what used to be LaRouche-caliber lunatic fringe extremism has now become the GOP mainstream was offered at the NC GOP holiday party hosted by US Rep. Charles Taylor. Ol' Chuck decided that no one exudes the Christmas spirit like the disgraced, indicted wacko Tom DeLay, whom he invited to be the featured speaker.

Former Republican House Majority Leader Tom DeLay called President Obama a Marxist at a large GOP gathering here Friday night and said the country must return religion to government.

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