NC GOP

McCrory's incompetence on display over Jaguar gaffe

Talk about a short attention span:

Gov. Pat McCrory tells the crowd about a secret meeting he had in England a year and a half ago with auto execs from Jaguar and Land Rover, where they took him to a pub in Stratford to “not talk business.”

“I don’t really drink at all, but I was taking a few sips and they were just downing it,” he says to laughter. And after several hours, they wanted to talk business – asking him why they shouldn’t move their jobs to Mexico. He realized the competition was no longer just Virginia, South Carolina and Tennessee. North Carolina is competing against the rest of the world, he says. And we ultimately lost that bid to Poland, he says.

The reason they were "just downing it" is because they were never really serious about building an auto manufacturing plant in North America. As usual, McCrory was just being used by more powerful people to help them get what they want. And if our Governor had been that interested in their final decision, he would know that Poland ended up losing the deal to Slovakia:

The media's hit-and-miss coverage of GOP voter suppression

False equivalencies and fear of conspiracy theories:

For corporate media, it’s safer to stay within the comfy template of false balance: Trump and the R’s say voter fraud is rampant; the D’s say it’s not. It is an improvement that some journalists are stating the obvious fact that voter fraud is a myth. But the debate seldom digs deeper. Doing so would require dealing with thorny issues that Americans tend to avoid in most public settings, namely the racism and inequality wrapped up in voter suppression. The “voter fraud—yes or no” conflict papers over all that.

While media outlets do (usually) acknowledge that voter fraud is a rare occurrence, they rarely point out the obvious follow-up point: That Republicans are using the myth to enact unnecessary laws that are targeted at minorities and college students. Read the whole thing. It's a harsh analysis, but it does provide some insight into the public's apparent lack of understanding on this important issue.

The ABC's of Kenny West's sexual harassment

Registering a 9.5 on the Creep Scale:

By the time B started working in Meadows' office in early 2014, West already had a reputation for inappropriate behavior toward women, she said. "I was told, 'Hey, by the way, you probably don't want to wear your hair in a ponytail when Kenny's in town, because he really likes to play with girls' hair when it's in a ponytail for some reason, and he seems to touch girls' hair a lot,' " she said.

West "would make comments and remarks that made me feel uncomfortable and also (was) very touchy," Witness C said. "He would place his hand on my shoulder and on my back." She said comments were "nothing explicit or anything blatant, just things that didn't feel appropriate."

As disgusting as it is to contemplate, physical contact of this sort is a form of "grooming." Predators often do this to gauge the reaction of the individual, to determine if that person is submissive enough to escalate. And this (admittedly hearsay) account is suggestive that such escalation did occur on at least one occasion:

The true costs of anti-abortion movements

Proving the "women's health" excuse is a dangerous myth:

From 2000 to the end of 2010, Texas’s estimated maternal mortality rate hovered between 17.7 and 18.6 per 100,000 births. But after 2010, that rate had leaped to 33 deaths per 100,000, and in 2014 it was 35.8. Between 2010 and 2014, more than 600 women died for reasons related to their pregnancies. No other state saw a comparable increase.

In the wake of the report, reproductive health advocates are blaming the increase on Republican-led budget cuts that decimated the ranks of Texas’s reproductive healthcare clinics. In 2011, just as the spike began, the Texas state legislature cut $73.6m from the state’s family planning budget of $111.5m. The two-thirds cut forced more than 80 family planning clinics to shut down across the state.

It might seem obvious to say Texas is big, but you really can't grasp the size until you try to drive your car from one point to another. I live between the Triangle and the Triad here in NC, and I can drive to the beach and back, or Asheville and back, in about 7 hours. It doesn't work like that in Texas, where it takes 8-10 hours just to get somewhere. And now, many women must travel that distance just to go to a clinic, which also means paying for 1-2 nights in a hotel. And make no mistake, several Republicans in the NC Legislature are looking to Texas for guidance on how to make that happen here:

Berger finally speaks on UNC Center, reveals true nature of program

And the partisan underpinnings are plainly visible:

Senate leader Phil Berger, an Eden Republican, said the concept originated with citizens who wanted to leverage university expertise to address state and local policy challenges. The collaboratory “was fleshed out and refined” through conversations with the UNC chancellor’s office, he said in an email.

“I have received numerous complaints about the existing philosophical and partisan homogeneity at UNC, where professors registered as Democrats outnumber Republicans by a ratio of roughly 12 to one,” Berger’s email said. “On several occasions I have recommended highly-qualified conservative candidates for positions at UNC and within the university system, and, to my knowledge, none have been hired to date.”

So your solution for that "imbalance" is to spend millions of taxpayer dollars to create an entity friendly to Conservative views and scholarship(?), and use that entity to give credibility to ineffective or counterproductive environmental policies. Gotcha. And who were these "citizens" who supposedly thought this up in the first place? I don't expect an answer to that question any time soon. If they actually exist outside of fiction, we likely won't be able to figure that out until the Center starts cranking out "research." But we'll be watching. Until then, here's what could be a warning:

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