NRA

Gunhinged

Reports from one day in one North Carolina newspaper:

A man is shot to death in a parking lot.

Police are investigating a shooting that took place early Sunday morning and the death of a 22-year-old man.

An apparently unstable man who apparently has plenty of guns threatens to shoot the Mayor of Raleigh.

Wayne County middle school uses fake gunman to "teach" lesson

Parents at Eastern Wayne Middle School are justifiably upset - school official sent a "fake" gunman into the school to "teach a lesson". The person - a student - wore a ski mask, carried a fake gun, and pretended to rob some of the students.

School officials said it was supposed to be an "enrichment exercise" to "teach students to be aware of their surroundings" but that they got "carried away".

That anyone working in a public school system would think this is appropriate says a great deal about the mindset in many rural parts of NC that can't seem to make the connection between guns and the consequences of gun violence.

Blog post on news story from the local Fox8 affiliate. (Wayne County, for those of you not familiar with points east in NC includes Kinston).

USA Today: Should 11 Million mentally ill persons be locked up?

Should 11 Million Mentally Ill Be Locked Up?
Our View: The Editorial Board, USA TODAY September 26, 2013

The awful mass killings this month by a delusional shooter at Washington's Navy Yard provoked familiar demands to fix the nation's mental health system. Polls show most Americans believe shoring up the system could help stop the carnage.

If only it were that simple.

God damn these f/cking cowards

Tagged:

NRA in retreat

Three unrelated news stories over the past few days, two of them national and one here in Haywood County, NC, must have the NRA and its 2nd clause of the 2nd amendment crowd reeling a bit. These stories should give pause to those who push ALEC-backed legislation that would arm our students and teachers, allow guns everywhere, sold by anyone to anyone without oversight.

NC legislators sign ALEC Stand Your Ground letter

Think Progress reports that the American Legislative Exchange Council sent a letter, supposedly signed by 300 local legislators, to Senator Dick Durbin. Durbin wants to investigate the role of ALEC in crafting Stand Your Ground (aka Right to Be Shot and Killed by a Gun Nut) laws in over half of US states. The laws, for the most part, are copy and paste jobs of ALEC's model.

The letter was supposed to have carried the clout of about 300 state legislators who signed onto it, but, according to an investigation by progressive group by ProgressNow, many of the signatures on that letter were falsified or duplicated.

The group said it was signed by 293 elected officials. But, ProgressNow found, 55 of the signatures are “blatantly invalid.”
“[A] simple Google search found that seven of the signatures on the letter were unidentifiable, four were spouses of elected lawmakers, 35 of the signatures were duplications and one was an expletive rant,” said ProgressNow Research Director Brian Wietgrefe in a release.

Silly ALEC can't even tell the truth about letters it's sending Senators.

Several NC legislators are on the list. If you value the safety of yourself and your children - and abhor groups like ALEC buying and paying for your state legislators - keep these names in mind come election time.

New groups in NC tackle gun violence

The past three months have been busy ones for North Carolinians concerned about the scope of gun violence in the United States.

In January, for instance, a few Apex and Cary residents gathered to discuss the issues involved and coalesced into the Kitchen Table Group. About 15 members of the group met in mid-February with a representative from U.S. Sen. Richard Burr's office to discuss their perspectives and suggestions. Later that afternoon, about a dozen of us traveled to Dunn to meet with representatives from U.S. Rep. Renee Ellmers. A month later, the Kitchen Table Group, led by Nancy van Dijk of Cary, has grown to more than 350 members and counting.

Money talks. Congress listens.

Money Talks. Congress Listens.

Does the NRA reflect the feelings of its members or the needs of its donors? What are its real priorities? A survey of membership in 2012 found that 74% of members are in favor of mandatory background checks for gun purchases. 74%. Why does NRA rhetoric not reflect this in their chosen talking points but instead pushes against background checks? Could it be that they don’t really serve their members but their masters--the armament producers? In the minds of most Americans there is a big difference between defending an individual’s right to gun ownership and a manufacturer’s supposed right to make huge profits by selling the same.

NC Congressional delegation talks about guns

Or goes out of its way to not talk about guns, I should say:

“It is appropriate that we have a national dialogue about how and why this kind of violence keeps happening,” said Hudson, a lifelong hunter and National Rifle Association member. “This is not an issue that can be solved by a new law. It has to do with culture, with mental health issues, with how we respond to the social isolation this young man evidently felt...

All of a sudden Republicans are concerned about mental health issues. It will be interesting to see if they back that up with funding (don't hold your breath). She probably didn't mean to, but Renee Ellmers came real close to the mark with this comment:

Top Democrat will seek new gun law

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D, said she intended to introduce a gun control bill on the first day of the next Congress. Paired with a twin version in the House, Feinstein's law would take aim at limiting the sale, transfer and possession of assault weapons, along with the capacity of high-capacity magazines.

"It can be done," she said on NBC's "Meet the Press." The senator, a proponent of gun control, said she expected Obama to offer his public support for the law.

Also on Meet the Press, NYC Mayor Bloomberg discussed the influence of the National Rifle Association in politics. Bloomberg said NRA’s power is ‘vastly overrated.'

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