Republican liars

Republicans use faulty evidence to indict Cooper

That report doesn't say what you think it does:

Rep. Marilyn Avila’s remarks were delivered through a couple of layers of politics: She spoke at a GOP news conference attacking Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper for problems at the lab, and she is running for re-election against the former lab director, Joe John.

Avila, a chemist who lives in Raleigh, never mentioned John in her remarks and only passingly criticized Cooper, who is running for governor. She focused on the larger concerns raised in the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report, which was released Tuesday.

She may have only "passingly" criticized Cooper, but the two others with her made up for that shortfall. And as I said on Facebook: In typical fashion, the NC GOP is now attacking Roy Cooper for a problem that is more their fault than his. The NC Crime Lab is woefully underfunded by the Legislature, lacking supplies, staffing, and crushed under unfunded mandates. And most attempts to rectify that, such as the bill I'm linking to below, are tossed into the committee dustbin. It would be nice to see a front-page story about this, but don't hold your breath:

McCrory staff lies again, attributes Char-O for their own (planted) questions

I wonder how he'll blame the media for this one:

McCrory’s staff planted questions at a lunch event in SouthPark on Thursday with the crowd under the impression that they were coming from the media or the audience. The moderator, a volunteer from the lunch audience, introduced three questions by saying they were from the Charlotte Observer.

Of course, those weren’t Observer questions. They were softballs from his staff about what he wanted to do with his next term; how he wanted to reduce the state’s rape kit backlog; and how the state crime lab performed under McCrory’s opponent, Roy Cooper.

Demagogues-R-Us: BergerMoore steps over the line

And the Bar Association has a responsibility to deal with it:

“Since today’s decision by three partisan Democrats ignores legal precedent, ignores the fact that other federal courts have used North Carolina’s law as a model, and ignores the fact that a majority of other states have similar protections in place, we can only wonder if the intent is to reopen the door for voter fraud, potentially allowing fellow Democrat politicians like Hillary Clinton and Roy Cooper to steal the election. We will obviously be appealing this politically motivated decision to the Supreme Court.”

Not only is this idiotic statement inflammatory as hell, publicly speculating that three judges could be attempting to facilitate a crime, based on nothing more than ad hominem party affiliation observations, appears to be a blatant violation of Rule 8.2 (hat-tip to commenter Paul Ditz):

McCrory's police cam language right out of Orwell

The Ministry of Truth would be impressed:

Not only did Gov. Pat McCrory sign a bill to block release of police body camera videos to the public, but he justified his decision with misleading doublespeak. “Governor McCrory signs legislation to promote transparency and safety for law enforcement and the public,” trumpets the headline of a news release his office distributed Monday afternoon.

“This legislation fulfills our commitment to protect our law enforcement and gain public trust by promoting uniformity, clarity and transparency,” McCrory said in the release.

When you feel the need to clarify a news story with "This is not the Onion," you just might be living in North Carolina. Sheesh.

Chasteen tries to walk back his efforts at book-banning

Telling lies is apparently now an accepted Christian practice:

Chasteen said he never wanted the book banned, but rather simply wanted an equal choice for students who didn’t want to read Allende’s novel.

“The fact is the community of parents requested a compromise, such as providing an option, a choice among books, without a student being removed from the classroom,” he wrote.

None of that is true. Chasteen worked both overtly and covertly to get the book removed completely from the reading list:

Rip van Holding's election-year attack on IRS

A desperate hail-mary pass to save his gerrymandered Congressional career:

The IRS is understaffed and woefully so. That’s the work of congressional Republicans, who remain suspicious that the IRS targeted conservative nonprofits for investigation some time back.

But Holding’s idea, to move the IRS’ criminal investigation units to the Department of the Treasury, which would create an organization called the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, is just unnecessary. (And, hey, isn’t Holding one of those small-government Republicans? So what’s this new agency business?)

This is plainly an effort to appeal to extremist Teapublicans, by "disarming government agents" and eroding the ranks of the IRS. If you're trying to figure out the benefits that might be gleaned by pandering policy moves, you'll be at it for a long time before coming up empty-handed.

Bait & switch for teachers, McCrory style

A chicken in every pot, unless those nasty wolves snatch it away:

Gov. Pat McCrory presented a package of education spending proposals Tuesday that included a 5 percent average teacher pay raise and bonuses that would average 3.5 percent. Unlike the 2014 event, McCrory made Tuesday’s announcement without legislative leaders and other lawmakers who focus on education in attendance. It is unclear whether leading Republican lawmakers support McCrory’s plan.

Senate leader Phil Berger’s and House Speaker Tim Moore’s offices did not respond to questions. In January, Moore said teacher raises were likely to be in the 2 percent range.

This is all getting so tiresome. McCrory makes promises the Legislature has no intention of honoring (roads, bridges and broadband), giving them both plausible deniability when those promises evaporate into thin air. Kabuki theatre at its finest. And of course the timing is suspect as well:

Workplace discrimination lawsuits much harder under HB2

More expensive and less likely to be resolved:

“For almost 30 years, North Carolinians who have been fired because of their religion, race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability have been able to bring claims in state courts under the common law theory of wrongful discharge in violation of public policy,” Noble said.

“By eliminating employees’ rights to pursue legitimate discrimination claims in N.C. courts, we unnecessarily force our citizens to the federal government and invite excessive federal intrusion into issues that are better handled at the state level,” Noble said.

In tort reform circles, this is a huge deal. North Carolina has joined a very exclusive club blocking discrimination from state courts, one with only Mississippi as a fellow club member. And for those seeking redress from unfair treatment, the journey just got a lot more difficult:

Lawyer for McCrory: Interviews "arranged," but not coordinated

The evidence is clear, the BoE needs to follow its own guidelines:

"The Committee's interviews with elected officials after the January 5 rally were arranged in a straightforward manner," wrote Steven Long, a lawyer for the Connect NC bond committee. "The Committee's staff asked several government officials, including Gov. McCrory and Rep. Goodman, if they would be willing to answer questions before a television camera to explain what they thought of the bond. ... None of the officials interviewed were aware beforehand of the questions that would be posed, none received a script or suggested comments form the Committee, and none were told how the film footage of their interviews would be used."

Both the Goodman and McCrory ads were plainly produced in a manner that boosted not only the Bond but the candidates themselves also. And both were in direct violation of the special opinion rendered by the NC Board of Elections:

NC Hometicks give astro-turfing another try

"Looking out" for homeowners, when they're not ripping them off:

Sen. Harry Brown, R-Onslow; Rep. Phil Shepard, R-Onslow; Rep. George Cleveland, R-Onslow; and Rep. Chris Millis, R-Onslow and Pender are slated to attend, alliance representative Paul Mott said.

He said the event is not about politics. “Our goal is to advocate for homeowners’ rights at the legislature,” Mott said. “This goal is to be a friendly conversation between homeowners and their elected officials. We’ll keep the questions geared toward homeowners’ issues.”

Yeah, that sounds nice. Unfortunately, Mott's "real" job is working for Cornerstone Solutions, whom the NC Realtors rely on for political success:

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