Republican liars

Bait & switch for teachers, McCrory style

A chicken in every pot, unless those nasty wolves snatch it away:

Gov. Pat McCrory presented a package of education spending proposals Tuesday that included a 5 percent average teacher pay raise and bonuses that would average 3.5 percent. Unlike the 2014 event, McCrory made Tuesday’s announcement without legislative leaders and other lawmakers who focus on education in attendance. It is unclear whether leading Republican lawmakers support McCrory’s plan.

Senate leader Phil Berger’s and House Speaker Tim Moore’s offices did not respond to questions. In January, Moore said teacher raises were likely to be in the 2 percent range.

This is all getting so tiresome. McCrory makes promises the Legislature has no intention of honoring (roads, bridges and broadband), giving them both plausible deniability when those promises evaporate into thin air. Kabuki theatre at its finest. And of course the timing is suspect as well:

Workplace discrimination lawsuits much harder under HB2

More expensive and less likely to be resolved:

“For almost 30 years, North Carolinians who have been fired because of their religion, race, color, national origin, age, sex or disability have been able to bring claims in state courts under the common law theory of wrongful discharge in violation of public policy,” Noble said.

“By eliminating employees’ rights to pursue legitimate discrimination claims in N.C. courts, we unnecessarily force our citizens to the federal government and invite excessive federal intrusion into issues that are better handled at the state level,” Noble said.

In tort reform circles, this is a huge deal. North Carolina has joined a very exclusive club blocking discrimination from state courts, one with only Mississippi as a fellow club member. And for those seeking redress from unfair treatment, the journey just got a lot more difficult:

Lawyer for McCrory: Interviews "arranged," but not coordinated

The evidence is clear, the BoE needs to follow its own guidelines:

"The Committee's interviews with elected officials after the January 5 rally were arranged in a straightforward manner," wrote Steven Long, a lawyer for the Connect NC bond committee. "The Committee's staff asked several government officials, including Gov. McCrory and Rep. Goodman, if they would be willing to answer questions before a television camera to explain what they thought of the bond. ... None of the officials interviewed were aware beforehand of the questions that would be posed, none received a script or suggested comments form the Committee, and none were told how the film footage of their interviews would be used."

Both the Goodman and McCrory ads were plainly produced in a manner that boosted not only the Bond but the candidates themselves also. And both were in direct violation of the special opinion rendered by the NC Board of Elections:

NC Hometicks give astro-turfing another try

"Looking out" for homeowners, when they're not ripping them off:

Sen. Harry Brown, R-Onslow; Rep. Phil Shepard, R-Onslow; Rep. George Cleveland, R-Onslow; and Rep. Chris Millis, R-Onslow and Pender are slated to attend, alliance representative Paul Mott said.

He said the event is not about politics. “Our goal is to advocate for homeowners’ rights at the legislature,” Mott said. “This goal is to be a friendly conversation between homeowners and their elected officials. We’ll keep the questions geared toward homeowners’ issues.”

Yeah, that sounds nice. Unfortunately, Mott's "real" job is working for Cornerstone Solutions, whom the NC Realtors rely on for political success:

Senator Burr lies shamelessly in national Op-ed

Trying to take a bite out of Apple:

The FBI believes that Syed Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, attempted to destroy as much evidence as possible before their attack. They did not, however, destroy everything. Investigators found an intact Apple iPhone in a vehicle they used.

The U.S. District Court for the Central District of California has issued an order directing Apple to assist law enforcement agents in unlocking the phone. There are no decryption demands in this case, and Apple is in no way required to provide a so-called backdoor. The FBI needs access to the phone so the agency can better piece together information about the terrorists and whom they contacted.

Bolding mine. In true GOP fashion, Burr reveals exactly what he's trying to do through his denial. The FBI is most certainly trying to obtain a backdoor that can be used on other devices in the future, by forcing Apple to create a custom program to circumvent security lockouts:

Meadows harps about serving constituents, while helping predatory mortgage lenders

To seem and not to be:

"When you come up to Washington, D.C., they want you to be on the team up here and what most Americans want is someone who comes up here and doesn't forget the people who send them here," Meadows told Greta Van Susteren on Fox News Wednesday night.

He said on Fox that Cruz's approach is, "Let's make sure what we do is really what's right for America, not for him or the lobbyists here or the Washington cartel."

Makes a good sound bite, but what Tea Party Mark doesn't brag about is doing the dirty work for banksters and other well-dressed loan sharks:

Pat McCrory channeling Ben Carson

When your past isn't sexy enough, fabricate something:

“Long before I was elected governor, one of the hardest things I ever had to do in my life was to come home after my job was eliminated and tell Ann I didn’t have a job anymore,” the governor says in the video. When he took office in 2013, he continues, “I knew what too many families in our state were going through. Our state had the fifth highest unemployment rate in the country.”

According to a 2014 Greensboro News & Record story about McCrory’s Duke career, Duke eliminated his job as a recruiting manager in 1988, a few months before his wedding. Three weeks later, the company hired him back as its training director – a job with far more responsibility.

And it's very likely that new job didn't come as a surprise to McCrory. When you're planning on promoting somebody in this fashion, you don't keep them in the dark, lest they take a position somewhere else before they get that magic phone call. Meaning, this whole (attempted) tear-jerker about breaking the bad news to his fiancé is nothing but fiction. They probably celebrated.

Carson's lies keep piling up

But it doesn't make his supporters even flinch:

Carson’s book said that he was introduced in 1969 to Gen. William Westmoreland, who was then the chief of staff of the Army and a recent commander of U.S. military operations in Vietnam. The meeting, the book said, was followed by Carson being offered a full scholarship to West Point.

The story held up until now. But in retrospect, it is clear that it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. The process to getting into West Point requires applicants to obtain a nomination, most commonly from their congressman, senator or vice president of the United States. The secretary of the Army — an appointed civilian leader — also can nominate a student for consideration, but the service’s four-star chief of staff — Westmoreland from July 1968 through June 1972 — is not eligible to do so.

And it looks like Westmoreland wasn't even in attendance at the time and place he was supposed to have offered Carson a slot at West Point. Maybe Ben got his stories confused? Did he try to stab the General instead, only to be foiled by his belt buckle? Was he going to hide the body in an Egyptian grain silo? These are important questions.

Brown's "historical blindness" on sales tax redistribution

Reducing the story to Tweet-size makes lying much easier:

Brown has blasted that 2007 decision repeatedly in recent weeks. “It killed 83 counties across the state,” he said. “What this bill does is correct that wrong. It helps those rural counties that got kicked in the teeth in 2007.”

He’s also been critical of the legislature’s leaders at that time, who happened to be Democrats. “The leadership that year led efforts that robbed and redistributed money from poor rural counties to rich urban counties,” he said.

Makes a good sound byte, but that's not what happened. I'll let one of Brown's fellow Republicans 'splain it:

More lies from the master himself

And this time McCrory's lying to the US Congress:

Gov. Pat McCrory was in sync with this talking-points paradox Monday when he testified before a U.S. House committee in Washington. McCrory’s budget proposal depends on $475 million in increased gas tax revenues that will be available only if the legislature adopts the Senate plan or something similar. But when he spoke about the state’s need for more transportation money, he touted the legislature’s push for a short-term gas tax cut.

“I just supported an effort … to reduce the gas tax,” McCrory told the House committee, pumping his hand in a palm-down gesture to emphasize the point. “I supported an effort to stabilize the current funding source that we have now.”

Call it what it is, Bruce. It's not a "paradox," it's an outright lie. A lie that started with Phil Berger in the NC Senate and has now made its way to Washington, DC. And the reason such a blatant falsehood has made it so far is because our media outlets can't bring themselves to challenge Republican leaders for their casual twisting of the truth. It would be funny if it wasn't so ominous.

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