Voter Integrity Project

SCOTUS: Weird with a beard

We're going to discuss photo IDs and vote suppression in just a minute.

But first, God and beards were before the Supreme Court on Tuesday in the case of Holt v. Hobbs. At issue: Whether a Muslim prisoner in Arkansas should be allowed to wear a beard in accordance with his religious faith. Per federal statute, prisons should allow such accomodation. As a compromise, the plaintiff, Holt, had agreed that a half-inch beard would satisfy his obligation to God.

University of Virginia law professor Douglas Laycock testified for the plaintiff.

Behind the scenes at the Voter "Integrity" Project

Land sakes. The big wheels at the so-called Voter Integrity Project are acting like a bunch of Thom Tillis losers. They get called out for questionable activities, and respond with cease-and-desist letters to silence their critics.

The main actors in this drama are Denise Stetter and Jay DeLancy, the communications director and executive director for the Voter Integrity Project respectively. It's a complicated story filled with conspiracy, intrigue, and incompetence, but it's well worth your while to dig through the details to see how the right-wing operates.

One thing you'll want to read is Stetter's original cease-and-desist letter. It's a beauty, hand-crafted with hysteria and hyperbole. Nice work, Ms. Stetter!

And then there's this remarkable transcription of a call between DeLancy and Cherie Poucher of the Wake County Board of Elections. Voice mail? Seriously?

The law says that as long as the voter approves and the judge approves that it’s OK, and I just want to be sure you’re OK with that - - but got a judge - - well, I’ll go ahead and tell you, Denise Stetter, she’s the chief judge over at Kiwanis in North Raleigh, near where we both live - - by Millbrook and Millbrook Exchange, I’m not sure what they call that place now - - the Millbrook Exchange Park. But the - - I think, if she had permission from you, I think she would allow it - - I haven’t even - - I just broached it with her - - but I wanted to talk to you also, just to see what you thought. We wanted to get in there and get a few shots of the interior with some people standing in line - - that are our people wearing masks, because we want to make some imagery, that makes the point that without ID you don’t know who’s voting.

And - - we would really like to have those shots and - - so much easier to do it there with all the right equipment you have rather than, than tryin’ stage it somewhere - - you know, with all the equipment we don’t have like the signage and whatnot - - but of course, that would be another way to do it, to - - you know, in the future like after the election, if you would lend us some of the signs to set up a fake polling station, but I’m wondering - - as dead as it’ll be tomorrow, if we could find a dead spot to bring about 6 or 7 people in there standing in line and get some quick imagery of them all standing there with masks on - - you know, and transacting the deal to vote, and so - - I know it’s off the hook - - but, it is technically it’s just imagery, so I’m thinking, you wouldn’t have to go to the County Board or the State Board for this kind of approval, as long as the - - you know, according to what I’ve read in the law as long as the chief judge and the voter himself approves of the photography - - and - - that’s it

I'm not a lawyer and this isn't a legal opinion, but it would be reasonable to conclude that the Voter Integrity Project is nothing but an ideological front for voter suppression, run by a bunch of morons and scammers. To my knowledge.

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