LizKazal's blog

New report highlights progress for NC river, calls for more success stories

New report highlights progress for North Fork First Broad River, calls for more success stories

Raleigh, NC.-On the eve of the close of the public comment period for the new Clean Water Rule, a new report tells the story of how the bedrock environmental law has helped to restore and protect the North Fork First Broad River from development and pollution.

Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, along with small businesses, released Waterways Restored, a series of case studies highlighting the success of the Clean Water Act in protecting places like the North Fork First Broad River, and calling for a new rule to restore protections for more than 135,000 miles of the state’s rivers and streams.

Two-thirds of the General Assembly earn a failing grade on the environment

Two-thirds of the General Assembly Earn a Failing Grade on the Environment
Legislators take the state backwards on environmental initiatives

Raleigh, NC- Today, Environment North Carolina released its 2014 legislative scorecard, and the results don’t bode well for our state’s environment.

“From fast-tracking fracking to failed action on coal ash, legislators showed their true colors this session, and it’s clear that their priority is not protecting North Carolina’s air, water or open spaces,” said Dave Rogers, Field Director with Environment North Carolina.

“Shalefield Stories” Released: Residents on the frontlines of fracking share stories of illness, water contamination, and more

Raleigh, NC — As the future of fracking in North Carolina hangs in the balance, residents in Pennsylvania, where drillers are already running roughshod, recounted their stories of illness, water contamination, and damage to their livelihoods from fracking and drilling operations. Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center released “Shalefield Stories” as the latest evidence that the controversial drilling practice should be kept far away from our water and communities.

“We’ve seen the environmental devastation of fracking add up across the country. But beneath the numbers are real people like Judy from Bradford County whose tap water became contaminated with barium and arsenic after the drillers started fracking on her land,” said Liz Kazal, field associate from Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center. “These are their stories, and it is our responsibility to heed their words of warning on fracking.”

Budget cuts threaten the Blue Ridge Parkway

Budget Cuts Threaten Future of Blue Ridge Parkway

New Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center Analysis Details Impacts of Budget Cuts to Beloved Parks

Asheville– As Congress deliberates on the federal budget, a new Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center analysis, entitled Death by a Thousand Cuts, exposes the challenges facing the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Smokies and other national parks and forests as a result of mounting funding cuts to the National Park Service.

“Along the Blue Ridge Parkway, campgrounds, visitors centers, and picnic areas were closed and ranger-led educational programs were cancelled for the summer,” said Liz Kazal, field associate with Environment North Carolina. “We don’t want a death by a thousand cuts for North Carolina’s national parks and forests.”

Fracking by the Numbers: What's in store for North Carolina?

As Governor McCrory and members of N.C. General Assembly continue pushing to open up North Carolina to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, a new report by the Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center called “Fracking by the Numbers” highlights the risks to North Carolina if the current moratorium on fracking is lifted.

The report is the first study of its kind to measure the footprint of fracking damage nationally to date— including toxic wastewater, water use, chemical use, air pollution, land damage and global warming emissions.

“In state after state, fracking polluted our air, water, and landscapes. If fracking is allowed in North Carolina, this is the kind of damage in store for areas like the Deep River” said Liz Kazal, field associate with Environment North Carolina. “North Carolina’s air, water, and land are just too important to risk. Governor McCrory and the General Assembly need to act now to protect North Carolinians’ air and water.”

Subscribe to RSS - LizKazal's blog